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Monday, November 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of Calculating the risk of mountain pine beetle attack found in the catalog.

Calculating the risk of mountain pine beetle attack

Calculating the risk of mountain pine beetle attack

a comparison of distance- and density-based estimates of beetle pressure

by

  • 229 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Pacific Forestry Centre in Victoria, B.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Mountain pine beetle -- British Columbia -- Fort St. James Region.,
  • Mountain pine beetle -- Dispersal -- British Columbia -- Fort St. James Region.,
  • Trees -- Diseases and pests -- Monitoring -- British Columbia -- Fort St. James Region.,
  • Trees -- Diseases and pests -- British Columbia -- Forecasting.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    StatementMichael A. Wulder ... [et al.].
    SeriesMountain Pine Beetle Initiative working paper -- 2007-11.
    ContributionsWulder, Michael A. 1968-, Pacific Forestry Centre.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16148621M
    ISBN 100662451333
    ISBN 109780662451334

    The relationship between the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and lodgepole pine tree (Pinus contorta) has historically been normative: periodic small scale outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (MPB) would attack and kill old or weakened pine trees which subsequently led to . The mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) is a bark beetle indigenous to western North America that primarily feeds on lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia), but also feeds on sugar pine (P. lambertiana Dougl.), western white pine Cited by: British Columbia (B.C.) has a wide-ranging response to the mountain pine beetle epidemic, which is expected to run its course by The province is focused on reforestation, forest inventory, product innovation and intensive silviculture. To date, it is estimated that more than million hectares ( million acres) of B.C.'s Interior forests are affected to some degree. (Hawksworth rating > 4) are more susceptible to bark beetle attack and will likely die within five years if they are successfully attacked by bark beetles (fir engraver, mountain pine beetle, Douglas-fir beetle, spruce beetle and western pine beetle only). To determine the likelihood of .


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Calculating the risk of mountain pine beetle attack Download PDF EPUB FB2

Calculating risk of mountain pine beetle attack: comparison of distance-and density-based estimates of beetle pressure January Journal of Environmental Informatics 8(2). Calculating risk of mountain pine beetle attack: comparison of distance- and density-based estimates of beetle pressure Author: Michael A Wulder ; Pacific Forestry Centre.

Calculating the Risk of Mountain Pine Beetle Attack: a Comparison of Distance- and Density-Based Estimates of Beetle Pressure M. Wulder 1*, J. White1, C. Dymond1, T. Nelson 2, B. Boots3 and T. Shore1 1Canadian Forest Service (Pacific Forestry Centre), Natural Resources Canada, Victoria, BC V8Z 1M5, Canada.

Calculating the Risk of Mountain Pine Beetle Attack: a Comparison of Distance- and Density-Based Estimates of Beetle Pressure An established model for risk rating of Pinus contorta stands for potential mortality caused by mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) combines information on stand susceptibility and beetle by: 3.

Journal of Environmental Informatics 8(2) () Calculating the Risk of Mountain Pine Beetle Attack: a Comparison of Distance- and Density-Based Estimates of Beetle Pressure By M. Wulder, J. White, C. Dymond, T. Nelson, B. Boots and T. Shore. especially in lodgepole pine, large reserves of these forests pose a constant hazard in areas climatically favorable for the mountain pine beetle (MPB).

Thus, "storing" mature/over mature trees on the stump should be discouraged, or at least the risk of such should be realized.

In addition, such as parks and wildernesses, should. mountain pine beetle infestations. A study area was selected in a severely infested site to identify three forest factors mountain pine beetles prefer.

These forest factors were used in a susceptibility model to identify other tree stands that may be vulnerable to mountain pine beetle outbreak in File Size: 1MB. Our approach to modelling stands at risk of mountain pine beetle attack is based on Shore and Safranyik (). Our intent is to investigate the potential for model improvements based upon knowledge gained from recent research, while also overcoming some of the previously noted limitations when determining risk over large by:   Mountain pine beetle is a devastating insect that burrows and bores into trees, cutting off nutrient lines and killing parts or wholes of pine — particularly lodgepole and ponderosa.

Already the cumulative area under beetle attack has increased, and we can expect higher altitudes previously protected by cooler temperatures to become a greater proportion of this area in the future.

Three different mathematical approaches are combined to develop a spatial framework in which risk of mountain pine beetle (MPB) attack on individual h Cited by:   Researching a new tool against the devastating mountain pine beetle.

pine, they have now evolved to also attack the jack pine. This means the boreal forest right across Canada is now at risk.

As the average diameter and density decreases, the risk of mountain pine beetle attack also decreases. Adults may select trees as small as one-inch in diameter for attack but will not reproduce in them.

Attacks in four to six inch trees are common during outbreak conditions and they can complete their life cycles within trees of this size.

Figure 2: Unsuccessful mountain pine beetle attack—commonly called a “pitchout.” Figure 3: Pitch tubes and boring dust— indicative of a successful mountain pine beetle attack in lodgepole pine. Figure 4. Fading mountain pine beetle-killed lodgepole Cited by: Distribution of the mountain pine beetle in North America.

Courtesy of USFS. Park Actions. Rocky Mountain National Park is just one relatively small area where trees are dying from the beetle epidemic. Because the task is enormous, the park’s priorities for mitigation of the effects of beetles are focused on removing hazard trees and hazard.

Mountain Pine Beetle Attacks. Over the past decade the Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendrocthonus ponderosae) has killed millions of pine trees from New Mexico to the Yukon Territory, as a result of an unprecedented explosion in their numbers. The causes behind the beetle outbreak has been the topic of research by numerous ecologists.

Possible causes have focused primarily on climate change induced. Mountain pine beetle (MPB) is an insect native to the forests of western North America and is also known as the Black Hills beetle or the Rocky Mountain pine beetle.

MPB primarily develop in pines such as lodgepole, ponderosa, Scotch and limber pines, and less commonly affect bristlecone and piñon pines. Mountain pine beetle Dendroctonus ponderosae Key Wildlife Value: The outbreak dynamics of mountain pine beetle differ depending on the pine host and stand type.

In pure lodgepole pine stands, mountain pine beetle and stand-replacing fire are the key agents responsible for recycling older stands. Stand-replacing wildfires initiate even-aged stands. The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is a wood-boring insect native to western North America and attacks a wide range of pine trees including lodgepole, ponderosa, western white, whitebark, limber and does not attack Jeffrey pine.

The mountain pine beetle (MPB) has many natural predators including insects, parasitoids and woodpeckers. CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): ABSTRACT. An established model for risk rating of Pinus contorta stands for potential mortality caused by mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) combines information on stand susceptibility and beetle pressure.

Susceptibility is determined using attributes in the forest inventory data, while beetle. Introduction. Forests are globally important due to the ecosystem services they provide (Trumbore et al., ).Recently, widespread mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreaks have occurred in the western United States and Canada, resulting in mass mortality across large areas of forest (Meddens et al., ).These outbreaks are driven in part by changes in regional.

surrounding the site, and is the surrounding pine made of high value, merchantable timber. An FO can help in determining this step as well as spatially recording the new site. The following documents will help further determine risk and describe the ecology of pine beetle: Calculating risk of mountain pine beetle attack: comparison of distance.

Introduction. Epidemic outbreaks of native mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae; MPB) populations have affected over million ha of predominantly lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var.

latifolia) forests in Colorado and southern Wyoming since Policy makers, forest managers, and the public are concerned that resulting tree mortality will increase fire risk (probability Cited by: Mountain Pine Beetle Aerial Survey (Heli-GPS) Beetle facts and biology.

The MPB, or Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a small bark beetle about to mm in length – about the size of a grain of rice. The MPB is the most destructive pest of mature pine forests in North America.

In this study, mountain pine beetle red-attack damage was detected and mapped using a logistic regression approach with a forward stepwise selection process and a set of calibration data representing samples of red-attack and non-attack from the study area.

Mountain pine beetle typically attacks the lower 15 feet of a tree. They kill their host trees in a single generation by girdling the phloem (i.e., the living tissue that carries organic nutrients to all parts of the plant where needed).

Signs of a mountain pine beetle attack include “pitch tubes”. Calculating the risk of mountain pine beetle attack: A comparison of distance- and density-based estimates of beetle pressure. Journal of Environmental Informatics 8(2) DOI: /jei Arc/Info Macro Language (AML) scripts for mapping susceptibility and risk of volume losses to mountain pine beetle in British Columbia Book January with 26 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

mountain pine beetle. The attack density of the mountain pine beetle is related to diameter and provides the basis for brood production. the population level of a specific risk or x Equations for calculating column values are found in CniA~o ().

Blue Mountains Forest Health Report: New acres activities allocations areas associated attack bark beetles become Blue Mountains caused changes increase infested insect intensities Issue killed lands larch less levels lodgepole pine long-term losses maintain methods mortality mountain pine beetle National Forest natural objectives occur.

Status in Canada. The largest recorded mountain pine beetle epidemic occurred in the s and s in British Columbia. Over 18 million hectares of forest were impacted to some degree, resulting in a loss of approximately million cubic metres (53%) of the merchantable pine volume by Mapping Percent Tree Mortality Due to Mountain Pine Beetle Damage John A.

Long and Rick L. Lawrence The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) is a pervasive and particularly destructive species of insect that has killed vast areas of conifers in western North Size: 1MB.

The mountain pine beetle, D. ponderosa attacks a broad range of pine species. It is native to western North America from Mexico to central British Columbia.

In western North America and the Rocky Mountains, D. ponderosa and its microbial associates has destroyed millions of hectares of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) ().

Warming temperatures are fueling the expansion of pine and spruce beetle outbreaks across North America, Europe, and Siberia, ravaging tens of thousands of square miles of woodlands. Scientists warn that some forest ecosystems may never recover. Accidental and intentional global movement of species has increased the frequency of novel plant–insect interactions.

In Patagonia, the European woodwasp, Sirex noctilio, has invaded commercial plantations of North American compared the patterns of resin defenses and S. noctilio-caused mortality at two mixed-species forests near San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina.

The Mountain Pine Beetle in Lodgepole Pine Risk Rating Event Monitor (EM) Addfile (I) () is an FVS keyword component file ( file) that calculates a stand’s hazard rating based on a system developed by Amman et al. The system was designed for mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) in lodgepole.

Mountain Pine Beetle Response Project Record of Decision Page 4 The project area includes nearlyacres of ponderosa pine forest stands at high risk for mountain pine beetle (MPB) infestation scattered across the million acre Forest.

The potential. Forest Near Mount Rushmore Suffers Beetle Attack Officials say the beetle-killed trees are a fire hazard, and the National Park Service is now pursuing the biggest forest-thinning operation in.

Calculating risk of mountain pine beetle attack: comparison of distance- and density-based estimates of beetle pressure. Wulder, M.A.; The effect of verbenone on dispersal and attack of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopk.

(Col., Scolytidae) in a lodgepole pine stand. The beetle and the damage done lifeless trunks. The trees were killed by the mountain pine bark beetle, an insect that has ravaged thousands of square miles of pine forests in mountainous areas over the past 15 years, including western Montana and the Black Hills of South Dakota.

(see “Tourism survives beetle attack”). The effect of removing lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) and retaining Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.)Franco) to reduce the risk of disturbance from mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopk.) in mixed conifer stands in southern British Columbia, Canada, on population processes influencing outbreaks of western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Cited by:.

A new report says the pine beetle population is staying below epidemic levels. Inmountain pine beetles impacted just under 5, acres in .Impacts of Mountain Pine Beetle.

Widespread mortality of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and commercial tree species such as sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana), western white pine (Pinus monticola) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa).

Increased risk of large fires with dead and dying trees creating a landscape of highly flammable stems.Models to predict the moisture content of lodgepole pine foliage during the red stage of mountain pine beetle attack.

Using modeled surface and crown fire behavior characteristics to evaluate fuel treatment effectiveness: a caution ; Crown fire potential in lodgepole pine forests during the red stage of mountain pine beetle attack.